Meet The Designer And Builder Behind The White House.

Monticello was designed by Thomas Jefferson. The Falling Water was created by Frank Lloyd Wright. The design of the Beverly Hills Hotel was by Paul Revere Williams. Whilst many iconic buildings’ architects are well known, the individual is elusive and unknown behind the White House.

So far, that’s. The White House’s Irish architect is presented on St Patrick’s Day, an anthology of academic essays and historical images, drawings, maps, news clippings and drawings. James Hoban: Designer and Builder of the White House ($49.95) by the White House Historical Association see the person and their business in the lens of its most famous achievement, the white house.

“James Hoban’s Storey is the beginning of a storehouse of the White House,” says Stewart McLaurin, president of the White House Historical Association, an anthology editor. “I wanted a group of American, Irish and British historians to tell his storey because I felt it was a long-overdue book on his life, inspirations and achievements.”

The book explores many of the architect’s mystery. McLaurin claims that Hoban had left few personal items and that in the 1880s his papers were burned down.

It is also mentioned in the anthology that Hoban owned slaves. Hoban received credit from the project and was built partly by slavery, while Hoban was responsible for all carpentry, brickwork and stonemasonry.

“This book examines Hoban’s life and work from various points of view and adds to his understanding of his status as a slave owner,” said McLaurin. “He was not alone in Washington in this early period of the history of our country, unfortunately in terms of his position as a slave holder.

It is also mentioned in the anthology that Hoban owned slaves. Hoban received credit from the project and was built partly by slavery, while Hoban was responsible for all carpentry, brickwork and stonemasonry.

“This book examines Hoban’s life and work from various points of view and adds to his understanding of his status as a slave owner,” said McLaurin. “He was not alone in Washington in this early period of the history of our country, unfortunately in terms of his position as a slave holder.


Written By Mahak Jain | Subscribe To Our Telegram Channel To Get Latest Updates And Don’t Forget To Follow Our Social Media Handles Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter. To Get the Latest Updates From Arco Unico

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