House in Lanškroun: Sloping Terrain In Czech Republic

Architecture firm situated in Prague Martin Neruda Architektura has finished a private residence in Lankroun, Czech Republic, with cascaded volumes of living rooms and outdoor spaces that gradually accept the undulating terrain of the south-facing site. The 200-square-metre House in Lankroun was planned as a new atrium ground-floor house to replace a demolished two-storey terraced house in a residential area of Lankroun. The client requested that he live in close proximity to the garden in the project brief. While the garage and garden storage are shielded from the street by translucent polycarbonate volumes, the front façade of the house has a cascaded look that frames the living spaces.

Design And Details Of The House in Lanškroun

House in Lanškroun / Martin Neruda Architektura | ArchDaily

With ash walls, oak or velvety pink poured flooring, and light green draperies, the team balanced concrete ceilings, lintels, and window sills in the rooms. Concrete, lime-stained bricks from the original demolished house, beige wooden window frames, polycarbonate and steel columns can all be seen from the garden. Perhaps in the future, the walls will turn green, the steel columns will rust, the concrete will develop a patina, and silhouettes of stored goods will come out from behind the polycarbonate.

Affordability And Impact Of The Pandemic

House in Lanškroun / Martin Neruda Architektura | ArchDaily

Inequalities have been exposed as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic, particularly when it comes to the unequal distribution of architectural resources among people. Europeans who could afford it, for example, left their major metropolises and moved to their second houses in the countryside at the outset of the pandemic. We’ve also seen how poorer individuals in cities like New York, for example, lack proper access to green spaces, which are an important aspect of human health.

There is no more versatile or ageless material than brick, which is used in both ancient and modern architecture. In many situations, removing the drywall from a historical structure reveals lovely brick walls, which provide texture, warmth, and character to a living room. The appearance works well in a variety of styles, from rustic to industrial, whether left raw or painted.


Written By Ankit Lad | Subscribe To Our Telegram Channel To Get Latest Updates And Don’t Forget To Follow Our Social Media Handles Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter. To Get the Latest Updates From Arco Unico

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