Pharrell Williams’ Goodtime Hotel in Miami Beach

In this Miami hotel designed by American designer Ken Fulk for musician Pharrell Williams, pastel colours and wicker furnishings mix delightfully with leopard-print fabrics. Williams and entrepreneur David Grutman collaborated on the Goodtime Hotel, which was designed to match the area’s iconic art deco architecture. While Fulk was in charge of the interiors, the building was designed by Morris Adjmi of New York, and the hotel’s outside settings were planned by landscape architect Raymond Jungles.

Revitalisation, Aesthetic And The Overall Theme Of The Hotel

Strawberry Moon beach club of Miami Beach hotel by Ken Fulk for Pharrell Williams and David Grutman

“We want The Goodtime Hotel to evoke a sense of renewal as well as that uncommon, exhilarating excitement that comes with discovering something extraordinary,” said Williams, who previously worked on a two-tower residential complex in Toronto.

It’s the rush of excitement that comes with entering a whole new environment and mindset. Everyone who visits this location will have a natural good time. Visitors enter The Goodtime Hotel with a double-height archway set within a corrugated facade, which is located in a central, historic portion of South Beach along Washington Avenue. The lobby is reached by an atrium filled with plants and adorned with a hand-painted hothouse mural and art deco plasterwork.

Interiors Of The Place

Lounge of Miami hotel with rattan furniture and leopard print pillows designed by Ken Fulk for Pharrell Williams and David Grutman

There are 266 rooms and 100,000 square feet of public area in the hotel. Strawberry Moon, a restaurant and 30,000-square-foot pool club, 45,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space, a gym, and the Library, a gleaming, peach-hued bar. The accommodations, which include a couple of suites, provide either sunset or sunrise views of Biscayne Bay or the Atlantic Ocean.

Fulk’s design concept for the hotel’s restaurant and pool club Strawberry Moon is inspired by Caribbean and Central American resort towns like Havana and Acapulco, which were prominent in the mid-twentieth century. Striped pastel tiling, retro scalloped bar seating, and pinstriped awnings all contribute to the overall concept.


Written By Ankit Lad | Subscribe To Our Telegram Channel To Get Latest Updates And Don’t Forget To Follow Our Social Media Handles Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter. To Get the Latest Updates From Arco Unico

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